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Meet Anahit Mushegyan, former marketer turned into a prenatal yoga teacher and a childbirth educator


“Institutions fail to protect the wellbeing of pregnant women and prevent them from being abused. I realized that somebody should do it, and it should be women because they are the ones going through the process. Giving birth allows to gain real knowledge about this and not just work with information”, Anahit Musheghyan, childbirth educator and prenatal yoga teacher.


Anahit’s journey into prenatal yoga started with her own pregnancy. She began researching to prepare herself, but only found medical information that was not deep enough for her. She noticed problems that nobody talked about.


What prompted you to leave your career in marketing and get into prenatal yoga?


“In Armenia, the level of education on pregnancy is insufficient. It was shocking to me that as a pregnant woman you need to fight for your own body and make sure you are not abused. Governments and institutions fail to do it. I realized that somebody should do it, and it should be women because they are the ones going through the process. Giving birth allows to gain knowledge about this and not just work with information”, says Anahit. She adds that being quarantined during COVID-19 was a chance to rethink her values and mission.


Anahit is currently one of the few prenatal yoga teachers in Armenia. She supports mothers-to-be throughout both prenatal and postnatal stages using evidence-based methods. Yoga, physical exercises and breathwork are some of her tools, but a bigger part is helping mothers-to-be release their stress and fears. On average, she works with pregnant women from 6 to 9 months.

Musheghyan practices with her daughter and husband.


“Most importantly, it’s about being present throughout your pregnancy and then staying aware of your new essence as a mother. Women are mostly focused on the process of birth, and they forget about themselves after it, which is a problem because statistically, that’s when most complications occur”, says Anahit.


Your original field of study and what you currently do are very different. Was it hard to leave marketing considering all the recognition you had in it?

“Yes, this is an ego struggle since you have ambitions and attachments. You need to distance yourself from things you used to be in the center of. In truth, my profession helped me a lot in my new career, because many things need to be communicated, argued for or pitched. But since we live in a commercialized society, when you leave the commercial field, you also need to let go of your relatively stable financial independence and parts of your social life. You go inside for a while. Then you come out as a new person”, says Mushegyan.


A lot of people feel stuck in their current jobs and question whether it’s possible to make a living with something different, even if they want to. What would you say to people who are in this stage of their transformation?


“It helped me to understand that the world is in a constant state of flow, and I was no exception. When you acknowledge this, you get used to change, so things start coming to you. Sooner or later you find your place in the flow. But if you try to go against the flow, you struggle. Also, I realized I did not want to be ‘successful’ all the time. Society is mostly focused on men, and male energy is all about success and non-stop work. I understood that I didn’t want to be a part of that. Sometimes I just want to fail, just go inside. I am a woman so I am flowing every month. I have ups and downs. It’s fine because it’s my nature, and I wanted to accept my nature. Now I work with women, and they understand this. If I feel a bit nervous, I will just say it and ask them to be more patient”, says Anahit.

Anahit Mushegyan: “Since we live in a commercialized society, when you leave the commercial field, you also need to let go of your relatively stable financial independence and parts of your social life. You go inside for a while. Then you come out as a new person”.


There are many different approaches to physical and mental wellbeing. Why did you get interested in yoga specifically?


“I had been practicing yoga for many years before I got pregnant, so prenatal yoga became a shortcut for me. Now I am building on it and would like to go into midwifery. I am somewhere between the medical field and yoga, and both are important. There are many medical standards and protocols to follow. People with certain conditions should avoid some of the exercises, and I must stay on top of that”, says Anahit.

Prenatal yoga is a recent phenomenon in Armenia, but Anahit believes this was more of an opportunity than a problem. She says that five years ago people would laugh at the term “prenatal yoga”, but now it is not uncommon for clients to find her because their husbands hear about the benefits of doula support and want their wives to have a smoother experience of pregnancy.



About Brand New Thought



Brand New Thought is a platform dedicated to paradigm shifts in personal development. It is founded by Razmik Sargsyan, a transformational coach helping individuals and groups achieve lasting freedom from anxiety while simultaneously increasing productivity, focus and clarity of mind.


Through highly personalized one-on-one coaching sessions, thematic group webinars and long-term mentorship programs, Razmik supports clients of multiple backgrounds and types of pressing issues, including stress, decision-making, confidence, time-management and many other aspects of life.


The Brand New Thought podcast features leading executive coaches and counselors who share their understanding of how the mind works and how to use that knowledge for creating a joyful and highly effective life.






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